Hikianalia Crew List: Tahiti to Hawai‘i, 2012

Captain Robert C. (Bob )Perkins

Where are you from? Redondo Beach, California

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? – 2001

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you?  Sailing on Hōkūleʻa defines for me the old adage “the journey is as important as the destination.”  The time I have spent on Hōkūleʻa has been challenging, intense, fun and funny.  But most of all it has allowed me to meet people from many walks of life and to call them friends and shipmates.  It has been said that Hōkūleʻa was created and maintained by community.  While there is no doubt that that statement is true, even more important to me is the fact that Hōkūleʻa brought together people from many differing walks of life and created a community.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV?  I have heard the adage that there is only one race, the human race.  For the most part, Hōkūleʻa embodies that.  I am hoping that the WWV will allow peoples of the world to view and understand the microcosm that is present on board Hōkūleʻa and expand it into their lives.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea?  Everyday life is good.  I enjoy my job, enjoy the people around me and teaching.

What do you miss about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life?  Being at sea for me is like being in the greatest church there is.  For the most part, I like reflecting on life when at sea.  And realizing how lucky we ALL are at having an opportunity to be alive and to be part of the Hōkūleʻa ʻohana.

Darienne Dey

Where are you from?  Mōʻiliʻili (Honolulu), HI & Mercer Island, WA

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa?  March 9, 2012

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Love for kūpuna and keiki, for each other (including people not even met…yet), and for the ocean, the earth, and the heavens.  She has the mana to awaken love in us that we never knew we had.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV?  Increased opportunities to interest students in math/science and culture, and for students to discover (for themselves) that these subjects are one and the same.

What do you crave most from your everyday life, when you are out at sea?  Getting to actually swim in the ocean!

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life?  How time seems to stop.

Crew Paul “Hiapo” Hiapomalulani Elderts

Hiapo Elderts tightening a shroud with Watch Captain Kealoha Hoe

Where are you from? Kahaluu Oahu

When did you first sail on Hokule’a? On a school field trip

What does Hokule’a mean to you? It means and embodies Hawaiian, Light, Spark, knowledge, learning, teaching, life, death, unification, heart, soul, Papa Mau,Ohana, future and so much more but I was told to keep it short.

What do you hope to accomplish by the WWV? To give everything I can give. To be apart of something bigger than me. To learn and to teach. To sail with my ohana to have a good time and to be safe and have everyone come home safe.

What do you miss most about your everyday life when at sea? Since I have been sailing for over a year now my life has been all about the sea and taking care of this ocean of ours, it is all of our kuleana, but other than that I miss my ohana. I had to miss some important events but they understand and support what I am doing not only for myself but for them and there future.

What do you miss most about your life at sea when you are back in your “everyday” life? I’ll tell ya when I get there.

Crew Mark K. Ellis

Where are you from? Nuʻuanu, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi

When did you first sail on Hokulea? -2007

What does Hokulea mean to you? Hōkūleʻa to me means opportunities: opportunity for all us to learn, grow and to make a positive difference in our own lives, our ʻOhana, our Ahupuaʻa, our Moku, our Pae ʻĀina and our Honua.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV?  That we go out and share our gifts of knowledge and learn from others their gifts of knowledge and then share those gifts back home.

What do you crave most from your everyday life, when you are out at sea?  My ʻOhana and ice-cold fresh water.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life?  Not sure, I can get back to you on this one.

Watch Captain Heather Nahaku Kalei

Where are you from? Hilo, HI

When did you first sail on Hokuleʻa? I’m not exactly sure, but the first time I touched her was early 2008… she was in drydock outside METC

What does Hokuleʻa mean to you?  Hokuleÿa is my teacher, adventure, shelter, and the link to one of the most incredible ÿohana I have known.  Because of her, I know that what is expected, both on the waÿa and in the community, is no less than my whole heart in everything I do.  She is a place where a person’s wealth and happiness does not come from money, rather it comes from self-exploration, curiosity, and adventure.  When I stand on her deck, I feel my ancestors with me, and I know that they are smiling.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV?  That our communities at home take the lessons taught to us by the people and places Hokuleʻa seeks out.  Lessons of how to malama ʻaina and each other better, and I hope that people are inspired to take action from it.  That from this voyage, we make Hawaii stronger, healthier, and ever more firmly rooted in her own unique and amazing style.

What do you crave most from your everyday life, when you are out at sea?  My family.  Non-dreadlocked hair is a distant second.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life?  Being able to watch and learn from the changing world. When I go home and re-box myself in my house, car, or office; my learning and connection to the things of the world – wind, stars, waves, rain – gets cut off.

Crew Nicole “Nikki” Pu´uwailani Kamalu

Where are you from? Born in Washington; raised on O´ahu and Kaua´i; currently residing in Honolulu, O´ahu.

When did you first sail Hokule´a? October 2009.

What does Hokule´a mean to you? Hokule´a is an important model of our proud cultural heritage. She allows us the opportunity to see the world uniquely through the eyes of our kūpuna on voyaging canoes.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? Given the mission of the WWV, I would like to see everyone acting on their kuleana in protecting and nurturing our ahupua´a consisting of land, ocean, and heaven. I would also like to see a growing commitment towards sustainability around the world.

What do you crave most from your everyday life, when you are out at sea? I have yet to learn that on my first long voyage.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? Freedom from a life full of stress.

Watch Captain Mark Keala Kimura

Where are you from? Kailua, Oʻahu

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? 2007

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you?  It’s a connection to my Hawaiian heritage.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV?  A better understanding of our oceans and how to protect them.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea?  My wife and kids, and surfing.

What do you miss about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life?  Time spent on the ocean is peaceful; it gives you time to think.

Watch Captain Attwood Maika‘i Makanani Holokahiki

Maka, © Monte Costa

Where are you from? Kaho‘olawe Pu‘uhonua Kohemalamalama o Kanaloa, Honuaula, Kealaikahiki a me Puna, Kaua‘i, Wailuanuihoano, Ka Pae ‘Aina

When did you first sail on Hōkūle’a? In 1975 at the age of 22, training to crew on the 1976 first voyage to represent na ‘ohana o Kaua‘i. I was steering Hōkūle’a as she took on water 10 miles off Nawiliwili, Kaua‘i with Tommy Holmes as my Watch Captain. The Seaflight Hydrofoil Kalakaua was captained by Gordon Leslie from Kealakekua, Hawai‘i who rescued Tommy Holmes on a surfboard paddling for help back to Kaua‘i. Just like Eddie Aikau in 1978 on a surfboard paddling for help not to be found.

What does Hōkūle’a mean to you? Hōkūle’a is my mother who is always and only number one. Along with my father the Captain/Navigator, with older and younger brothers and sisters who never met each other before that become my ‘ohana and family of Kanaloa, te moana nui. It is here on Hōkūle’a that you see through the eyes of your kūpuna, aumakua, and ke akua feeling with their naʻau, their heart, and poʻo (mind) and listening with their pepeiao (ears), everything becomes clear with no distractions. With the loss of the heavens from sight, the ocean will come through Hōkūle’a the waʻa kaulua through you and back to heaven. A true pu’uhonua that can be understood and experienced with the family of Kanaloa voyagers of waʻa kaulua of kanaka maoli ka pae ‘āina te moana nui.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? To honor kūpuna kane and kūpuna wahine that have come since time in memorial that we have inherited within our families, like moʻokuauhau (ancestral memory) with genealogy and kuleana as gifts to sustain ua mau ke ea o ka ʻāina a me te moana nui i ka pono through ceremonial protocol with kinolau (life forms) to heal and to feed those in need. Kinolau, such as the spring waters of Kanaloa i ke kai nei, Ku kamaka e niu ola (coconut) with waters of life. The spring waters of Kane i ka wai ola. The paʻakai from the moana of ka pae ‘āina. ‘Alaea (lepo). Olena. ‘Awa. These are all very sacred important kinolau forms of life for traditional healing and cleaning purposes. You must call upon life to save life to give life. A rededication and restoration of the puʻuhonua is needed, not wanted. King Kalākaua of the sovereign Hawaiian Kingdom sailed around the world establishing treaties with other countries for peace, liberty, and justice for all in accordance with international law. Kalākaua voyaged around the world to provide for and protect the best interests of kanaka maoli and the world that he knew was needed for everyone. Queen Liliʻuokalani tried her best to continue to provide what was needed for kanaka maoli people, the pae ‘āina, including the world like King Kalākaua and Papa Mau Piailug from Satawal – my first father with Kanaloa who taught navigation and building a bridge, a stick, a bridge to connect the world with each other. It is with great honor to continue their legacy especially with Hōkūle’a, a double-hulled voyaging canoe.

What do you crave most from your everyday life when out at sea? My family from the ‘āina. I miss my mother and my father, my sisters and brothers, and my family, my aunties and uncles, and cousins, especially my children and grandchildren, and hanai family. It is the worst and saddest time to leaves oneʻs family behind. To know that you may never see them again. That you many never come back to land again. Without a trace like you never existed and to be completely forgotten, a figment of one’s imagination. My family whoever they may be, I always miss the most when I am out at sea.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back at your everyday life? My family of Kanaloa of the moana. My mother the canoe, my father the kapena and navigator. My older and younger brothers and sisters. My family that I never knew, was never told that I had, that I found for the first time in the moana of Kanaloa. I miss my ‘aumakaua the kohola, the naiʻa, the ‘ia and those that swim in the ocean below in the moana. The fledgling manu – being a child of Kanaloa, the iwa, the manu o kū, and all the of those that live in the sky, that fly and sail on the wind of time from the ocean and the land again. The taste of the paʻakai of the kapukai and pikai of keia la and mahina. Of the rising and setting of the rainbow of colors about no distractions, only consequences with choices that you are never alone and always with your elders, your teachers, of the heavens and the earth. I miss the stars that come down to earth that lift the canoe up into the heavens. I miss the oceans below that come through the canoe through me and back to heaven that I had forgotten – that have been clouded – without hearing, able to find with myself thought lost now found. It is the closest feeling that I have to remember that we have been gifted with and how to take care of it and to share it and to never take it for granted. And to continue without looking back and never to forget and to remember to live every day as if it was the last day of my life, unconditionally with no regrets, with nothing less than the best. In honor of those that continue with me that set the foundation that stand upon that we will continue e ola mau ku like kako e onipaʻa ka la hui. Imu na pua lanakila o Kahoʻolawe. From the puʻuhonua kohemalamalama o Kanaloa. May the fire be tended and grow ever brighter and we will continue.

To all the fire keepers. May the fire be tended and grow and never go out. Ti hei maoli ola.

Crew Chadd ‘Onohi Paishon

For more on Chadd, See Chadd ‘Onohi Paishon

Crew Brenda Smith

Where are you from? My husband and I moved to Oʻahu in 2010

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? 2012

What does Hokulea mean to you? While taking classes at METC and working on Hōkūleʻa’s major drydock, I learned about celestial navigation and the inspirational role of Hokule’a and PVS in the renaissance of the Hawaiian culture.  I feel truly lucky to have participated and look forward to continuing to contribute in whatever way I am able.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? I would like to see the message spread throughout the communities that we visit on the Worldwide Voyage that caring for the land, caring for the sea, and caring for the living things – this is what we need to be our primary focus in order to have a healthy environment.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? Our trip from Tahiti back to Hawaiʻi on Hikianalia will be my first deep-water voyage.  I am very much looking forward to the peace and rhythm of the sea, and the endless sky full of stars.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? I do not know yet.

Medical Officer Krista Tla-chit-in-itl Stogryn

Where are you from? The communities of Ahousaht and Tofino, on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada.

When did you first sail on Hokule’a?  I met the Hokule’a while she was in dry dock last year, but I haven’t been to sea with her. This will be my first journey with PVS on the Hikianalia.

What does the Hokule’a mean to you? The Hokule’a is the heart, spirit and vision of the Hawaiian people, a deep respect for the wisdom and teachings of the ancestors, the commitment and devotion to keeping that alive, and the willingness to share with all people. It is a beautiful story of reclaiming culture and heritage that captures the mysticism of seafaring in the hearts of us all. It is a story I have loved sharing, and I have seen how much it lights people up from the inside.

What do you hope to see accomplished by the world wide voyage? That people and cultures around the globe be lifted up and inspired by the journey of the Hawaiian people, and that they may find greater awareness and respect for indigenous knowledge and indigenous peoples, and the spirit of the ancestors in themselves.

What will you miss most being at sea? All my relations… my mother and father and their spouses, and my brother and partner in the lower mainland; my sister and her husband in Winnipeg; my grandpa and grandma, and all my aunts, uncles and cousins from Edmonton; all my family and friends in Ahousaht, Tofino, Victoria and beyond; and my beautiful fur family Luna and the Prince. I am so grateful for your presence in my life and for all your love and support. Holding you close and carrying you with me in my canoe always.

What do you miss about being at sea in everyday life? The feeling of being at sea is always with me and I am blessed that the ocean is a part of my everyday life. When on land I miss the freedom and simplicity of being on the water, the sound and feel of the waves against a hull underway, the smell of salt air, and the closer connection with all our relatives in the sea.

 Crew Keli Takenaga

Where are you from? Oʻahu

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? The first time I sailed on Hōkūleʻa was in my heart and in my dreams many years ago.

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you?  Hōkūleʻa has become a family member.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV?  I’d like to see heart-to-heart connection made with other across the globe to build a more caring, sustainable and compassionate future.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea?  Ask me when we get back from Tahiti.

What do you miss about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life?  The sea, the sky, the horizon.

Crew Mike Taylor

Where are you from?  Originally, Mississippi.  Since 1986, Kailua, Koʻolaupoko.

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa?  Training – 2002, Voyage – 2004

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Hōkūleʻa and PVS have been a whole new life for me.  I came seeking sailing adventures, but instead found something far more important – an ʻohana with amazing values.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV?  An opportunity to share what PVS has learned in exchange for learning for what others have to teach us about how we can all mālama Planet Earth.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life when you are out at sea?  Love of family and friends, health, safety, serenity, knowledge, ice cream

What do you crave most when not out at sea?  Safety, camaraderie among the crew, exhilaration of sailing fast, new experiences and knowledge, ice cream

Crew Saki Uchida


Where are you from? Yokosuka/Hayama, Japan

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa?  2007, when Hōkūleʻa came to Japan

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Hōkūleʻa means ” Hōkūleʻa ” to me.  It’s hard to explain in words….

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV?  I would like to see the world get closer.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life when you are out at sea?  I don’t have deep sea voyage experience, so I don’t know yet.

What do you crave most when not out at sea?   I will find out after this voyage.

Crew Brad Kaʻaleleo Wong

Where are you from? Kailua, Oʻahu

When did you first sail? 2010

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Hōkūleʻa represents an amazing history of ocean explorers in the pacific. If not for these individuals and the level of commitment to the ocean and knowledge they had of this world, the Hawaiian culture and all the other island cultures within the Pacific would not be here today. Hōkūleʻa truly is a cultural icon and our link as Hawaiians to our amazing past.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? I hope that we all understand the need to mālama our environment and care for it as we care for each other on the canoe.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? Nothing, there is no greater feeling like being on the ocean. Although family and friends are great, too.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? My everyday life keeps me near the ocean, so no worries!

Michael Kors Outlet
Michael Kors Handbags Outlet
www.apartmentsarenadorada.com
Christian Louboutin Outlet
Replica Christian Louboutin
Christian Louboutin Replica
www.afalapalma.org
Red Bottom Shoes
Cheap Red Bottom Shoes
Red Bottoms
christian louboutin replica
replica christian louboutin
christian louboutin outlet
red bottom shoes
christian louboutin outlet
wholesale jerseys
cheap jerseys
fake oakleys
oakleys outlet
cheap oakley sunglasses
michael kors outlet
michael kors handbags
Christian Louboutin replica
Christian Louboutin shoes
Christian Louboutin shoes
Fake oakley sunglasses
cheap oakley sunglasses
Fake oakleys
cheap oakleys
red bottom shoes christian louboutin outlet michael kors wholesale nfl jerseys wholesale jerseys cheap jerseys fake oakleys oakleys outlet cheap oakley sunglasses michael kors outlet Christian Louboutin replica Christian Louboutin shoes http://www.exographica.com/
Michael Kors Outlet
Michael Kors Factory Outlet
Michael Kors Outlet Online
Michael Kors Outlet Store
http://www.renegaderollergirlssocal.com/
Red Bottom Shoes
Christian Louboutin Outlet
http://www.gaywomyn.org/
Michael Kors Outlet
Michael Kors Factory Outlet
Michael Kors Outlet Online
Michael Kors Outlet Store
http://www.naturalhideawaymedispa.com/
Michael Kors Outlet
Michael Kors Handbags Outlet
Michael Kors Purses
Michael Kors Purses Outlet
http://www.socialidarityjobs.com/
Michael Kors Wallet
Michael Kors Outlet
Michael Kors Wallet Outlet
Cheap Michael Kors Wallet
http://www.wildflushkennel.com/
Red Bottom Shoes
Red Bottom Heels
Red Bottom High Heels
Red Bottoms
http://www.dallasmagpies.com/
Christian Louboutin Outlet
Louboutin Outlet
Replica Louboutin
Louboutin Replica
Christian Louboutin Replica
Replica Christian Louboutin