Hikianalia Crew List: Aotearoa to Tahiti, 2012

Captain Bruce M. Blankenfeld

Bruce, © Monte Costa

Where are you from? Niu, Oʻahu

When did you first sail? February, 1977

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Our connection to our cultural past, wisdom and the opportunity to discover our role in helping to care for Hawai‘i, our homeland and our Island Earth.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? An awakening by everyone who cares about the health of our Island Earth, and they discovering, realizing, and then getting active to do their part – large or small – to help make a difference. Then, together, we do truly set upon a good course toward healing the earth.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? Still doing my best to help the mission succeed.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? Nothing.

Crew Christopher R. Baird

Where are you from? I live in Kaimuki, Oʻahu, but I grew up in Waimea (God’s Country), on the island of Kauaʻi.

When did you first sail Hōkūleʻa? Back in 1985

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Hōkūleʻa is such a special treasure. It provides the opportunity to tie the past with the present and the future. She has the ability to bring people together from near and far and to enable them to enjoy wonderful experiences.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? I would like to see society begin to realize we need to take care of our environment.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? I crave the everyday normal stuff. Simple things like walking my dogs, working in the yard and, of course, family and friends.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? I miss the camaraderie of the crew. You depend on each other for everything when you are on the canoe.

Crew Magnus Danbolt (Captain of Hine Moana)

From the October 14 AM report:

“Another wonderful learning opportunity on this voyage is the presence aboard of Magnus Danbolt. Magnus has been associated with the Te Mana O Te Moana (TMTM) voyage for the past three years. Their voyage was carried out by seven “vakas”, as they called them, very similar to Hikianalia. They traveled between 30 to 40,000 nautical miles, a remarkable distance in such a short span of years. Magnus was captain of Hine Moana and tasked with coordinating the fleet of seven vessels, therefore, their “admiral.”

“It is safe to say no one on Earth knows more about sailing this family of Salthouse vaka moana than Magnus.  It has long been a mark of good seamanship and deep-sea voyaging to seek local knowledge when entering unfamiliar waters.  That’s the role Magnus is fulfilling for us.  He is invaluable in answering all our questions and providing us with lessons learned from the TMTM voyage.  In addition, Magnus is an unbelievable sailor and mariner, a trained and experienced marine biologist (specializing in cetaceans), a complete gentleman and one of the nicest people you could hope to meet.  It is a wonderful gift to have him aboard.”

Crew Paul “Hiapo” Hiapomalulani Elderts

Hiapo Elderts tightening a shroud with Watch Captain Kealoha Hoe

Where are you from? Kahaluu Oahu

When did you first sail on Hokule’a? On a school field trip

What does Hokule’a mean to you? It means and embodies Hawaiian, Light, Spark, knowledge, learning, teaching, life, death, unification, heart, soul, Papa Mau,Ohana, future and so much more but I was told to keep it short.

What do you hope to accomplish by the WWV? To give everything I can give. To be apart of something bigger than me. To learn and to teach. To sail with my ohana to have a good time and to be safe and have everyone come home safe.

What do you miss most about your everyday life when at sea? Since I have been sailing for over a year now my life has been all about the sea and taking care of this ocean of ours, it is all of our kuleana, but other than that I miss my ohana. I had to miss some important events but they understand and support what I am doing not only for myself but for them and there future.

What do you miss most about your life at sea when you are back in your “everyday” life? I’ll tell ya when I get there.

Crew Heidi Kai Guth

Where are you from? — Born on Maui; raised on St. John, Virgin Islands

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? — 2004

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? — That we all have much to learn from our ancestors and much that we should want to teach our children.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? — A noticeable shift in people’s awareness that the planet, her ocean and all her people are interconnected on so many levels that each of us can make a positive difference. Therefore, I hope that by the time Hōkūleʻa returns home to Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi deserves to be recognized internationally as a positive example of protecting our natural environment through respecting both the environment and each other.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? — People who I love and being able to swim.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? — Having the horizon be completely curved ocean – no land – it’s an experience of open possibilities, connections to anywhere, and complete peace.

Watch Captain Kealoha Hoe

Where are you from? Hakipuʻu, Oʻahu

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? – 1992, but first deep-sea voyage in 1999

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? She allows us the opportunity to sail in the wake of our kūpuna.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? That we were able to influence communities around the world to see the values of the resources of their environment.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? ʻOhana

What do you miss about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? The solitude.

Crew David Komine

Where are you from? I was born and raised in the town of Kailua on the island of Oʻahu.

When did you first sail Hōkūleʻa? When Hōkūleʻa sailed to Kailua its first time, I set out in darkness, paddling my 3-man canoe before the sun rose to be the first person to greet her in my home waters. It was an honor then, but the turning point for me was when my friend Kaʻau McKenney invited me to train and crew for the Worldwide Voyage. It was a natural progression for me personally, and felt it was an honorable way to perpetuate Hawaiian culture and the art of wayfinding.

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? I have followed Hōkūleʻa since it first sailed to Tahiti in 1976, watching friends Billy Richards and Dukie Kuahulu make the historic voyage. It was the same as watching the first moon landing for me, and the flames of the Polynesian renaissance just exploded after it.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? I hope to not only share my pride and experience as a Hawaiian Pacific Islander but the fact that our Mother Earth, as tough as she may seem, needs to be treated the same as we would care for our elderly parents – with lots of love, kindness and careful planning. I want to hear other cultures’ opinions on what they feel is happening to our environment and their suggestions to improve it.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? I find it peaceful when I’m on the water and can detach from the daily challenges of life on land, but I have dreams of huge salad bars while at sea. My mouth waters at just the thought of it.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? Mauka to makai is my way to balance my environment. I respect and appreciate the ocean when I’m biking or hiking the mountains, and the wind and birds in the forest while on the water. One drives the desire for the other.

Watch Captain Attwood Maika‘i Makanani Holokahiki

Maka, © Monte Costa

Where are you from? Kaho‘olawe Pu‘uhonua Kohemalamalama o Kanaloa, Honuaula, Kealaikahiki a me Puna, Kaua‘i, Wailuanuihoano, Ka Pae ‘Aina

When did you first sail on Hōkūle’a? In 1975 at the age of 22, training to crew on the 1976 first voyage to represent na ‘ohana o Kaua‘i. I was steering Hōkūle’a as she took on water 10 miles off Nawiliwili, Kaua‘i with Tommy Holmes as my Watch Captain. The Seaflight Hydrofoil Kalakaua was captained by Gordon Leslie from Kealakekua, Hawai‘i who rescued Tommy Holmes on a surfboard paddling for help back to Kaua‘i. Just like Eddie Aikau in 1978 on a surfboard paddling for help not to be found.

What does Hōkūle’a mean to you? Hōkūle’a is my mother who is always and only number one. Along with my father the Captain/Navigator, with older and younger brothers and sisters who never met each other before that become my ‘ohana and family of Kanaloa, te moana nui. It is here on Hōkūle’a that you see through the eyes of your kūpuna, aumakua, and ke akua feeling with their naʻau, their heart, and poʻo (mind) and listening with their pepeiao (ears), everything becomes clear with no distractions. With the loss of the heavens from sight, the ocean will come through Hōkūle’a the waʻa kaulua through you and back to heaven. A true pu’uhonua that can be understood and experienced with the family of Kanaloa voyagers of waʻa kaulua of kanaka maoli ka pae ‘āina te moana nui.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? To honor kūpuna kane and kūpuna wahine that have come since time in memorial that we have inherited within our families, like moʻokuauhau (ancestral memory) with genealogy and kuleana as gifts to sustain ua mau ke ea o ka ʻāina a me te moana nui i ka pono through ceremonial protocol with kinolau (life forms) to heal and to feed those in need. Kinolau, such as the spring waters of Kanaloa i ke kai nei, Ku kamaka e niu ola (coconut) with waters of life. The spring waters of Kane i ka wai ola. The paʻakai from the moana of ka pae ‘āina. ‘Alaea (lepo). Olena. ‘Awa. These are all very sacred important kinolau forms of life for traditional healing and cleaning purposes. You must call upon life to save life to give life. A rededication and restoration of the puʻuhonua is needed, not wanted. King Kalākaua of the sovereign Hawaiian Kingdom sailed around the world establishing treaties with other countries for peace, liberty, and justice for all in accordance with international law. Kalākaua voyaged around the world to provide for and protect the best interests of kanaka maoli and the world that he knew was needed for everyone. Queen Liliʻuokalani tried her best to continue to provide what was needed for kanaka maoli people, the pae ‘āina, including the world like King Kalākaua and Papa Mau Piailug from Satawal – my first father with Kanaloa who taught navigation and building a bridge, a stick, a bridge to connect the world with each other. It is with great honor to continue their legacy especially with Hōkūle’a, a double-hulled voyaging canoe.

What do you crave most from your everyday life when out at sea? My family from the ‘āina. I miss my mother and my father, my sisters and brothers, and my family, my aunties and uncles, and cousins, especially my children and grandchildren, and hanai family. It is the worst and saddest time to leaves oneʻs family behind. To know that you may never see them again. That you many never come back to land again. Without a trace like you never existed and to be completely forgotten, a figment of one’s imagination. My family whoever they may be, I always miss the most when I am out at sea.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back at your everyday life? My family of Kanaloa of the moana. My mother the canoe, my father the kapena and navigator. My older and younger brothers and sisters. My family that I never knew, was never told that I had, that I found for the first time in the moana of Kanaloa. I miss my ‘aumakaua the kohola, the naiʻa, the ‘ia and those that swim in the ocean below in the moana. The fledgling manu – being a child of Kanaloa, the iwa, the manu o kū, and all the of those that live in the sky, that fly and sail on the wind of time from the ocean and the land again. The taste of the paʻakai of the kapukai and pikai of keia la and mahina. Of the rising and setting of the rainbow of colors about no distractions, only consequences with choices that you are never alone and always with your elders, your teachers, of the heavens and the earth. I miss the stars that come down to earth that lift the canoe up into the heavens. I miss the oceans below that come through the canoe through me and back to heaven that I had forgotten – that have been clouded – without hearing, able to find with myself thought lost now found. It is the closest feeling that I have to remember that we have been gifted with and how to take care of it and to share it and to never take it for granted. And to continue without looking back and never to forget and to remember to live every day as if it was the last day of my life, unconditionally with no regrets, with nothing less than the best. In honor of those that continue with me that set the foundation that stand upon that we will continue e ola mau ku like kako e onipaʻa ka la hui. Imu na pua lanakila o Kahoʻolawe. From the puʻuhonua kohemalamalama o Kanaloa. May the fire be tended and grow ever brighter and we will continue.

To all the fire keepers. May the fire be tended and grow and never go out. Ti hei maoli ola.

Watch Captain Mike Taylor

Where are you from? Originally, Mississippi. Since 1986, Kailua, Koʻolaupoko.

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? Training – 2002, Voyage – 2004

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Hōkūleʻa and PVS have been a whole new life for me. I came seeking sailing adventures, but instead found something far more important – an ʻohana with amazing values.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? An opportunity to share what PVS has learned in exchange for learning for what others have to teach us about how we can all mālama Planet Earth.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life when you are out at sea? Love of family and friends, health, safety, serenity, knowledge, ice cream

What do you crave most when not out at sea? Safety, camaraderie among the crew, exhilaration of sailing fast, new experiences and knowledge, ice cream.

Crew Saki Uchida

Where are you from? Yokosuka/Hayama, Japan

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? 2007, when Hōkūleʻa came to Japan

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Hōkūleʻa means “Hōkūleʻa” to me. It’s hard to explain in words….

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? I would like to see the world get closer.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life when you are out at sea? I don’t have deep sea voyage experience, so I don’t know yet.

What do you crave most when not out at sea? I will find out after this voyage.

Crew Brad Kaʻaleleo Wong

Where are you from? Kailua, Oʻahu

When did you first sail? 2010

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? Hōkūleʻa represents an amazing history of ocean explorers in the pacific. If not for these individuals and the level of commitment to the ocean and knowledge they had of this world, the Hawaiian culture and all the other island cultures within the Pacific would not be here today. Hōkūleʻa truly is a cultural icon and our link as Hawaiians to our amazing past.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? I hope that we all understand the need to mālama our environment and care for it as we care for each other on the canoe.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? Nothing, there is no greater feeling like being on the ocean. Although family and friends are great, too.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? My everyday life keeps me near the ocean, so no worries!

Crew Kaleomanuiwa Wong

Where are you from? Koʻolaupoko, Oʻahu a Lua

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa? 1999

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? A physical manifestation of a living culture, perpetuating the ʻike of our ancestors.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? A greater awareness of indigenous knowledge and indigenous peoples around the world.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? Family

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? Being out in the open ocean, and in the same elements traveling as our ancestors have traveled for thousands of years.

Crew Gary Yuen

Where are you from? Kailua, Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi

When did you first sail on Hōkūleʻa?  1985 – crew on board the escort boat Dorcus – through all of French Polynesia, Mitiaro and the Cook Islands. 1987 – crew on Hōkūleʻa throughout the Hawaiʻi statewide sail.

What does Hōkūleʻa mean to you? A never-again accumulation of events shared between strangers young and old. Voyaging into the past aboard a representation of an ancient voyaging canoe with young, untried ideas at the start, and family oriented at the closure of every adventure.

What would you like to see accomplished by the WWV? A successful, humble affirmation of what Hōkūleʻa has stood for from the very beginning.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? Family and friends being safe at home.

What do you miss about being out at sea when you are back in your everyday life? Listening to the passing sea breeze, listening to the sea touching Hōkūleʻa, and seeing a shared vision of stars with the family of the canoe.

Medical Officer Ira “Kawika” Zunin, MD

Where are you from? I first came to Hawaii in 1987. Originally from California, before coming to the islands I also lived abroad in Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

When did you first sail on Hōkūle’a? 2009

What does Hokule’a mean to you? Hōkūle’a is a vast vessel that holds the hearts and dreams of people worldwide for a life in harmony with the earth’s inhabitants and its natural environment. Hōkūle’a is an emissary of good will, which transforms the community that built it, the places it visits and the crew that care for her. The canoe offers a deep homecoming in the middle of the night, on the great ocean under the stars, which orient the wayfinder to time and place.

What would you like to see accomplished on the WWV? The WWV will bring together diverse peoples of the globe for our shared mission to steward natural resources and human relationships in a way that safeguards this planet for generations to come. The WWV will foster the next generation of wayfinders in Hawaiʻi and beyond.

What do you crave the most from your everyday life, when out at sea? Out at sea, serving as crew on the Hōkūle’a is physically arduous and demanding. There is little time for sleep and the need for constant vigilance. We sail at the pleasure of our ancestors and the ocean. It is only when at sea on Hōkūle’a that I crave absolutely nothing.

What do you miss most about being out at sea when you are back in everyday life? Since first sailing on Hōkūle’a, I have never been back in everyday life. The WWV started when it was first imagined. We are already well underway. It will end only if we forget who we are.

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